Social Studies - Teaching Materials from teachinghistory.org

 
Colonial
Revolutionary War
Civil War
Immigration
20th Century
Civil Rights Movement
Progressive Movement
 
 
 
 
 
Colonial
 

Jamestown:  The Starving Time
This lesson provides a great opportunity for students to engage in real historical inquiry with prepared sources. The lesson is displayed in three locations on the site: the student view, which guides the student through the activity; the teacher view, which provides additional background information; and a PDF file that contains scripted instructions for the lesson.

 

Midnight Ride of Paul Revere: Fact, Fiction, and Artistic License
This lesson asks students to use primary source evidence to assess Grant Wood’s famous 1931 painting, The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere. Students must also determine the event's historical significance. This lesson offers a wealth of resources for analyzing artwork as historical evidence and provides a nice example for using artwork along with written documents to learn about the past.

Revolutionary War
  The Boston Massacre: Fact, Fiction, or Bad Memory
With iconic historical events such as the Boston Massacre it can be difficult to separate historical fact from myth. This lesson acquaints students with some of the subtleties of constructing historical accounts. It allows them to see firsthand the role of point of view, motive for writing, and historical context in doing history.
Civil War
  The Multiple Dilemmas of Abraham Lincoln
This lesson, an interactive historical simulation, presents students with five difficult decisions Abraham Lincoln made between his election in November 1860 and the battle of Fort Sumter in April 1861. The strength of this lesson is the wealth of primary and secondary source evidence that it uses to help students understand the challenging questions Lincoln faced.
  Civil War Photos: What Do You See?
This lesson provides an excellent opportunity to teach students how to analyze historical photographs. Focusing on one photograph of a piece of Civil War artillery (though making use of a variety of other images), the lesson guides students step by step in carefully analyzing various elements of the photograph.
  A Look at Slavery Through Posters and Broadsides
This well-planned lesson, which uses posters on slavery and abolition, teaches students to ask important questions as they read a primary source.
  Roads to Antietam
This lesson on the Battle of Antietam provides an excellent opportunity to both teach military history and promote historical thinking skills. Students will hone these skills as they analyze two documents written by General Lee on the eve of the Battle of Antietam. The first document, Lee’s 1862 Proclamation to the people of Maryland, sheds light on Lee’s motivations for invading Maryland. The second document, Special Orders #191, is Lee’s marching orders that were famously intercepted by the Union Army before the battle.
  What Events Led to Lincoln's Assassination?
The best thing about this lesson is the primary account of the crime by an eyewitness observer.
Immigration
  Immigration
  Immigration:  Discovering Angel Island: The Story Behind the Poems
20th Century
  Causes of World War I
This video shows a 9th-grade history class applying new knowledge about causal reasoning to the question of whether two bullets were, in fact, responsible for the start of World War I.
  Powers of Persuasion: Poster Art from World War II
Created for a 1994 exhibit, this site examines poster art as a method of persuasion during World War II. Featuring 33 posters and one audio clip--the song "Any Bonds Today?"--the materials are divided into two sections.
  Pictures of World War II
  Civil Rights and Incarceration
In this lesson students view and take notes on a 10-minute newsreel describing the evacuation and relocation of Japanese Americans from western states during World War II. Students analyze the movie using a handout.
  Woman Suffrage and the 19th Amendment
This lesson is anchored by nine primary source documents related to the women's suffrage movement, from 1868 to 1920.
Civil Rights Movement
  Opening Up the Textbook: Rosa Parks
This easy-to-follow lesson cuts to the heart of historical thinking. Its strength is that it requires students to go to the sources in order to develop historical knowledge.

Progressive Movement

  The Cost of Industrialization
One of the greatest strengths of this lesson is its wealth and variety of primary sources. In addition to firsthand narrative accounts, the site also includes many photographs and political cartoons for students to analyze.